Category Archives: Big-Game Hunting

Secrets to the Big Game Draw

2018 Big Game BrochureAre you interested in big game hunting opportunities in Colorado, but you’re struggling with the limited license application process? If so, Bryan Posthumus’ Secrets to the Big Game Draw Seminar will help you simplify the application process, create a preference point strategy, and make the most of your limited license applications. If you want to hunt big game in Colorado, this is your chance to learn the secrets to the big game draw. Read more

2017 Hunter Testimonials

With the 2018 big-game season in our sights, it’s a great time to take a look back to some of the hunter testimonials that were recently submitted by proud hunters. If a picture is worth a thousand words, this collection of testimonial tells an impressive story about successful wildlife conservation that is supported by your hunting and angling fees. Please enjoy the following hunter testimonials, which celebrate another great year in the Colorado outdoors!

Chet-Bull

Chet Blue Sky and Wayne Gardner with bull elk.

Hunter: Chet Blue Sky
Chet Blue Sky with bull elk and good friend Wayne Gardner.  Both cashed in 15 preference points in the “Ranching For Wildlife” program on the Three Forks Ranch in GMU 5. Read more

2018 Colorado Outdoors Preference Point Issue

2018-Pref-Points

If you’re a Colorado big-game hunter, now’s the time to prepare for the 2018 hunting seasons.

Colorado Outdoors, Colorado Parks and Wildlife’s conservation magazine, is a valuable planning resource for hunters. The Jan/Feb issue features preference-point data and statewide herd-population estimates to guide big-game hunters in applying for limited big-game licenses. This is a must-have item for any Colorado hunter. Read more

Livin’ the Wildlife: Rocky Mountain Elk

 

elk bugle

An elk bugles during the rut. Video capture by Jerry Neal/CPW.

Living in Colorado, it’s easy to take for granted our enormous elk herds. After all, Colorado is home to nearly 280,000 animals — the largest elk population in North America. But did you know that elk were near extinction at the turn of the century? In fact, fewer than 1,000 elk remained in Colorado during the early 1900s. The elk’s dramatic demise was attributed to unregulated market-hunting.

A century ago, Colorado Parks and Wildlife imported 350 elk from Wyoming to re-establish dwindling herds. The elk were transported and released in Idaho Springs and in the Greenhorn Mountains in Pueblo County. Sportsmen also called for regulated hunting seasons to protect and manage elk populations. From these meager transplants, and through decades of conservation programs, elk populations have soared to the abundant herds for which Colorado is now famous. Read more

Tools, Tips, & Tactics – Locating Deer and Elk

Locating Deer and Elk. Video by © Jerry Neal/CPW

Colorado Parks and Wildlife biologists, park rangers and wildlife managers spend a substantial part of their careers in the field. This time in the field offers our experts valuable interaction with the public and, in turn, allows them to share information about what they are seeing and directly respond to the public’s questions. In an upcoming series of blog posts titled “Tools, Tips, and Tactics,” Colorado Outdoors Online will share advice and guidance from agency experts on a broad range of topics, including hunting, fishing, recreational trail use and much more. Read more

Shedding Velvet

COVER-buck-shedding-velvet-Wayne-D-Lewis-DSC_0128This time of year, most outdoors-obsessed Coloradans grab their cell phones, Nikons, Canons — anything with a lens — and head to the mountains in search of Instagram-worthy photos of changing aspens. Local TV forecasters show detailed maps of peak times in peak areas, guiding caravans of leaf lovers into the hills. For them, the official signs of the change of season are mountains painted yellow and gold.

I, however, wanted to chronicle a different sign of the season — one more interesting to orange-clad hunters: that of mule deer bucks shedding their antler velvet. During the first few weeks of September, a few times a week, I would leave work and head to the Rocky Mountain Arsenal Wildlife Refuge in northeast Denver hoping to find bucks lit by the golden-hour light. At the Arsenal, they have decent populations of both mule and white-tailed deer, but by the time I started this project, the whitetail bucks had all shed their velvet.

Andy Holland, a Colorado Parks and Wildlife big game manager, thinks that the peak date for mule deer shedding is Sept. 15. “But it varies,” he says. Read more

« Older Entries