Tag Archives: Moose relocation

Moose on the Loose: Why Are Colorado’s Shiras Moose Showing Up in Front Range Suburbs?

A cow moose rests on a lawn in Lakewood. Photo by CPW.

A cow moose rests on a lawn in Lakewood. Photo by CPW.

In this segment of “Ask the Biologist,” Colorado Outdoors Online reader Carol Metz asks:

Question: “Why are moose showing up in residential areas along the Front Range?”

Last week, Arvada and Lakewood residents got quite the surprise when two Shiras moose sauntered into town. Colorado Parks and Wildlife officers were able to tranquilize the rogue animals and safely relocate them to more remote habitat in South Park. However, local residents are curious as to why moose appear to be vamoosing the marshy wetlands of Colorado’s mountain parks and are now exploring suburbia.

CPW Biologist Shannon Schaller. Photo by Jerry Neal/CPW.

CPW Biologist Shannon Schaller. Photo by Jerry Neal/CPW.

Colorado Parks and Wildlife Biologist Shannon Schaller explains some of the reasons why moose are expanding their range, why urban sightings may become more common and also offers a few tips on how to play it safe around these large, powerful animals.

Answer:

“There are several reasons why we are seeing more moose along Colorado’s Front Range. Moose are a pioneering-type animal and adapt to a variety of habitats. With their size and forage demands, moose typically travel within a home range of 3-6 miles. However, they seasonally wander much farther searching for food and available habitat, which occasionally brings them into suburban areas.

Additionally, Colorado’s moose population is expanding statewide. In fact, our moose population is doing so well that it’s growing more rapidly than in most other states. As the moose population grows, moose will continue to move out of the core locations where they were initially introduced (North Park, Grand Mesa) and into adjacent areas that may provide suitable habitat—including towns and suburbs. Many times these wandering moose will move back out of suburban areas on their own in a matter of a few days or a week. However, wildlife officers may decide to relocate a moose if there is the potential that the animal may be harmed by vehicles, harassed by pets or if it poses a threat to human safety. Read more