Tag Archives: rainbow trout

Whirling disease-resistant trout thriving in Arkansas River

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A Gunnison River rainbow trout after it was caught last May during spawning operations by Colorado Parks and Wildlife biologists. Because they are resistant to deadly whirling disease, Gunnison River rainbow trout are being spawned so that strain of rainbows can be stocked in rivers across the state. Photo by © Bill Vogrin/CPW

A recent survey by Colorado Parks and Wildlife biologists found rainbow trout thriving in the Arkansas River near Salida offering a hopeful sign for wildlife conservation efforts aimed at overcoming whirling disease, which decimated trout populations in Colorado after its discovery in the 1980s. Read more

Simply Perfect

Rainbow trout ready for the grill. All photos by Wayne D. Lewis/CPW.

Rainbow trout ready for the grill. All photos by Wayne D. Lewis/CPW.

I’ve long thought, and it’s highly unlikely that I am alone in the thought, that bananas are the perfect food. They come in easy-to-carry bundles, are individually wrapped, with the biodegradable wrapper giving an extremely accurate and up-to-date report of the condition of the nutritious goodness within. But for the omnivore, carnivore or pescavore, what food comes close to the banana’s perfection?

Rainbow trout.

Rainbow trout.

My vote is for trout.

And I’m talking fresh-caught trout, not the store-bought kind. Not that there is anything particularly wrong with store-bought fish, but when you catch them you get the satisfaction of knowing freshness, and going fishing and bringing trout to the net is far more enjoyable than the bumper-cart madness of the grocery store. In addition, a stringer of rainbows, browns, brookies and/or cutthroats is much more satisfying to carry than a bunch of bananas. Once caught, trout are almost as easy to clean for the grill as bananas are to peel. Bass, bluegill, crappie, etc. are all delicious, but filleting them (for me anyway) is a far more arduous task. For years, I’ve released every fish I caught back to the water, but some tasty meals over the last year or so have me thinking, “the heck with catch and release, fish are for eating.” Read more

Fishing Close to Home: Officer’s Gulch

Those looking to fish for brook and rainbow trout within easy access of I-70 should check out the picturesque little lake at Officer’s Gulch. The lake’s crystal-clear waters are bordered by an easily hiked trail that winds along the banks and through the trees. Ample parking and its location right off Colorado’s main east-west thoroughfare make this a popular spot.

According to the Summit Historical Society, Officer’s Gulch is not designated in honor of law enforcement or the military, but in fact, is named after James Officer, an early day Ten Mile Canyon resident who mined the gulch.

Officer’s Gulch is located about midway between the towns of Frisco and Copper Mountain at Exit 198. Standard fishing regulations apply.