Tag Archives: Waterfowl hunting

The ducks are coming! Colorado hunters can expect a good waterfowl season

dog duck close (1) for blog

A Lab retrieves a mallard duck. Photo by Jerry Neal/CPW.

If you are a duck hunter, you know the mingled joy (watching the sunrise over a river, calling in mallards to your decoys) and challenge (sitting quietly in a frosty duck blind) that comes with hunting waterfowl. In Colorado, the waterfowl hunting season is long and plentiful—which should give you plenty of time to experience both. The primary waterfowl season begins in October (check here for dates pertaining to specific areas).

“With waterfowl hunting opportunities extending from mid-September teal seasons to light goose conservation seasons ending in April, there are many opportunities for hunters to enjoy opportunities to harvest ducks and geese in Colorado,” said Jim Gammonley, avian program leader at Colorado Parks and Wildlife (CPW). See our resource guide here.

Colorado’s waterfowl environments are diverse, ranging from shallow wetlands to large reservoirs. Most of the ducks present in Colorado during the hunting season are migrants from breeding areas north of our state, Gammonley noted.  Typically the best hunting is available when a cold front pushes birds south along the Central or Pacific Flyways (or “aerial highways”) from southern Canada, the Dakotas, Montana and Wyoming. Read more

Fowl Weather Duck Hunt

 

3IMG_1541-o

Photo by David Lien.

Although I’ve been an avid upland and big-game hunter for most of my life, over the years I’ve only dabbled in waterfowl (duck and goose) hunting. And after moving to Colorado from Minnesota seventeen years ago, waterfowl hunting fell completely by the wayside, until a friend and dedicated waterfowler, Tim Brass (State Policy Director for Backcountry Hunters & Anglers), invited me on a January 2015 goose hunt.

Watching V-shaped flocks of honking Canada geese flying overhead, not to mention those enticed to within shotgun range, rekindled my desire to hunt waterfowl. For those with the same latent duck and goose hunting itch, first you’ll want to purchase the appropriate licenses and stamps. Waterfowl hunters need a small-game license, for starters.

Hunters age 16 or older are also required to purchase a $25 Federal Migratory Bird Hunting and Conservation Stamp (Duck Stamp) and a $5 Colorado State Waterfowl Stamp. In addition, pick up a $10 Colorado Habitat Stamp (for anyone aged 18 to 64), but only one is required per hunter each year, in the event you bought one with your turkey, big-game or upland-game license.
7Hunt-Ducks-Me-Fed Duck Stamp-2015

Read more

Your Colorado Waterfowl Hunting Resource Guide


Excitement, adventure, beautiful scenery—that’s what hunting in Colorado is truly about. And there’s no better way to experience all three than waterfowl hunting.

Whether you’re a beginner who’s looking to experience your first hunt or a seasoned veteran who has been away from the duck blind for a while, there has never been a better time to hunt ducks and geese in Colorado. The following 12 resources and tips will help you get the most out of your hunting experience this season:


1. Abundant Duck Populations Await Hunters in 2017

A black Lab and mallard ducks. Photo by Jerry Neal/CPW.

A black Lab and mallard ducks. Photo by Jerry Neal/CPW.

For Colorado waterfowl hunters, 2017 could be an excellent year. Thanks to several years of wet weather and good nesting conditions across the Continental United States and Canada, nationwide duck populations remain above average. With excellent numbers of ducks likely to pass through the state this winter, there has never been a better time to dust off the decoys, grab the Labrador and high-tail-it to your favorite warm-water slough, river, lake or reservoir.

Read more

Duck Hunting – The Colorado Decoy Rig

Colorado Outdoors “Quick Tips” Videos

Duck decoys are an essential tool for every serious waterfowl hunter.   But organizing floating decoys and keeping anchor lines tangle-free is a constant challenge.  In this video, you will learn how to setup and breakdown your decoy spread quickly and easily–all while keeping your hands warm and dry on blustery days. This innovative decoy-anchor system is based on the popular Texas-style rig but with a Colorado twist.