Collaborative program for wildlife and Colorado water

The Platte River Recovery Implementation Program supports the recovery of four threatened and endangered species by improving and maintaining habitat.
Whooping Crane
Whooping Crane

A victory for wildlife and Colorado water, Secretary of the Interior David Bernhardt, Colorado Governor Jared Polis, and the Governors of Nebraska and Wyoming signed a Cooperative Agreement to extend the Platte River Recovery Implementation Program.

Map of Platte River Recovery Implementation Program (PRRIP) associated habitats reach (AHR) and Platte River watersheds.
Map of Platte River Recovery Implementation Program (PRRIP) associated habitats reach (AHR) and Platte River watersheds.

Supporting Threatened and Endangered Species

“This collaborative program supports the recovery of four threatened and endangered species (interior least tern, pallid sturgeon, piping plover, whooping crane) by improving and maintaining habitat in the Platte River in Nebraska while allowing for continued water use in Colorado,” said Colorado Water Conservation Board Director Rebecca Mitchell. “We look forward to continuing our role in the upcoming years of the Platte River Recovery Implementation Program.”

“The commitment by the states and the U.S. Department of the Interior to continue the program’s innovative approach to species recovery and Endangered Species Act compliance is a win-win for the future of Colorado’s citizens and the environment,” said Governor Polis.

The Program was set to expire at the end of 2019. However, with support from the Colorado Water Conservation Board; Colorado Parks and Wildlife; the Department of Natural Resources; and other state, federal, and non-governmental partners; a bill supported by the entire Congressional delegation from Colorado, Nebraska, and Wyoming was passed and signed by the President before the New Year.

Celebrating A Record of Success

Together with its water users, the Colorado Water Conservation Board is celebrating the Program’s more than a decade record of success. As the Program enters into its next 13 years, it has momentum to continue to recover threatened and endangered species, which provides assurance for future water use in Colorado.

To learn more please visit the Platte River Recovery Implementation Program.

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