Author Archives: Jerry L. Neal

Moose Attacks Are Increasing

Weighing up to 1,000 pounds and towering 6 feet high at the shoulder, moose are Colorado’s largest wild mammal. These massive animals are relatively unafraid of people and can pose an enormous risk to public safety. Each year, more people are attacked by moose than by any other species of wildlife, and moose are one of the most unpredictable and dangerous animals in our state. Read more

Always Photograph Wildlife from a Safe Distance

Colorado is home to one of the most abundant and diverse wildlife populations in the world. From deer and elk to bighorn sheep and moose, more than 960 species live in our great state. While this makes for an exciting opportunity to view and photograph wildlife, it’s important that you act responsibly to avoid potentially dangerous human and animal conflicts. When photographing with their cell phones and cameras, people often get too close to wild animals. And these close encounters can result in serious injuries for both wildlife and humans. If an attack occurs, Colorado Parks and Wildlife is required to euthanize the animal – even if the attack was provoked because a person got too close. Please help us protect wildlife by taking some simple precautions. Read more

Video: ‘Livin’ the Wildlife’ Red Fox

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Sibling rivalry at its best: Fox kits pose for a photo at a den near Evergreen, CO. Photo by Jerry Neal/CPW.

The red fox (Vulpes vulpes) is the largest and most common fox species in Colorado.

Known for its cunning nature and intelligence, the “sly” fox is a skilled predator and scavenger. The fox is also well adapted to live among humans, and it often dens and hunts in urban/suburban areas. Read more

Southern Colorado’s Largest Outdoor Expo Returns June 2

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The Colorado Springs “Get Outdoors Day,” southern Colorado’s largest outdoor expo, is back at Memorial Park on Saturday, June 2, 2018.

The all-day event runs from 9 a.m. – 3 p.m., and it features outdoor fun and adventure for the entire family.

More than 30 different activities are available, including biking, boating, kayaking, climbing, archery, shooting, fishing and fly fishing. Read more

Colorado’s 2018 Spring Turkey Forecast

Colorado’s 2018 turkey season kicks off Saturday, April 14. And, if you plan to hunt gobblers, there are plenty of reasons to get out there and “strut your stuff” this spring. Abundant turkey populations, easy to obtain licenses and good access to public land are all available to hunters this season.

Gorman“Turkey hunters should see a good season here in Colorado in the spring of 2018,” said CPW Small-Game Manager Ed Gorman. “Populations are healthy and robust. Production was good last summer. Good numbers of birds, good access–all the things you look for in a successful turkey season.”   

The “gobble” of a wild turkey is one of the most recognizable sounds in all of nature. Yet, the wild turkey’s boisterous call was nearly silenced in the early 1900s due to poaching and habitat loss. Thanks to decades of conservation programs and aggressive trap-and-transplant efforts, however, the turkey is now one of Colorado’s most abundant gamebirds and also one of the state’s biggest conservation success stories. Read more

2017 Colorado Pheasant and Quail Hunting Forecast

2017 Colorado Pheasant and Quail Hunting Forecast. Video by © Jerry Neal/CPW

Colorado pheasant and quail hunters have plenty to be excited about this year when the season opens statewide on November 11. Pheasant and quail populations have increased dramatically, setting the stage for what could be a very good season for upland hunters. Check out this year’s Colorado pheasant and quail forecast video to see what’s in store for upland hunters. Pheasant hunting tips are also available right here on Colorado Outdoors Online.

Read more

Livin’ the Wildlife: Rocky Mountain Elk

 

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An elk bugles during the rut. Video capture by Jerry Neal/CPW.

Living in Colorado, it’s easy to take for granted our enormous elk herds. After all, Colorado is home to nearly 280,000 animals — the largest elk population in North America. But did you know that elk were near extinction at the turn of the century? In fact, fewer than 1,000 elk remained in Colorado during the early 1900s. The elk’s dramatic demise was attributed to unregulated market-hunting.

A century ago, Colorado Parks and Wildlife imported 350 elk from Wyoming to re-establish dwindling herds. The elk were transported and released in Idaho Springs and in the Greenhorn Mountains in Pueblo County. Sportsmen also called for regulated hunting seasons to protect and manage elk populations. From these meager transplants, and through decades of conservation programs, elk populations have soared to the abundant herds for which Colorado is now famous. Read more

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