Author Archives: Jerry L. Neal

2017 Colorado Pheasant and Quail Hunting Forecast

2017 Colorado Pheasant and Quail Hunting Forecast. Video by © Jerry Neal/CPW

Colorado pheasant and quail hunters have plenty to be excited about this year when the season opens statewide on November 11. Pheasant and quail populations have increased dramatically, setting the stage for what could be a very good season for upland hunters. Check out this year’s Colorado pheasant and quail forecast video to see what’s in store for upland hunters. Pheasant hunting tips are also available right here on Colorado Outdoors Online.

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Livin’ the Wildlife: Rocky Mountain Elk

 

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An elk bugles during the rut. Video capture by Jerry Neal/CPW.

Living in Colorado, it’s easy to take for granted our enormous elk herds. After all, Colorado is home to nearly 280,000 animals — the largest elk population in North America. But did you know that elk were near extinction at the turn of the century? In fact, fewer than 1,000 elk remained in Colorado during the early 1900s. The elk’s dramatic demise was attributed to unregulated market-hunting.

A century ago, Colorado Parks and Wildlife imported 350 elk from Wyoming to re-establish dwindling herds. The elk were transported and released in Idaho Springs and in the Greenhorn Mountains in Pueblo County. Sportsmen also called for regulated hunting seasons to protect and manage elk populations. From these meager transplants, and through decades of conservation programs, elk populations have soared to the abundant herds for which Colorado is now famous. Read more

10 Tips for Hunting Doves in Colorado

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A harvested mourning dove. Photo by Jerry Neal (CPW)

When it comes to small-game hunting, doves are arguably the greatest challenge for wingshooters. Although these fast flyers are Colorado’s most plentiful game bird, you’ll need to bring your “A” game to fill the 15-bird daily limit.  The following tips and information will help you have more fun and put more doves in your game-bag.  Additionally, the 2017 season has been extended to November 29, which will give huners an increased opportunity to get out into the field.
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Video: Life of a Professional Wildlife Photographer

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Have you ever wondered what it takes to capture those amazing wildlife photographs seen in Colorado Outdoors?

In this video, Colorado photographer Vic Schendel offers an intimate look into the world of professional wildlife photography.  Schendel, a frequent contributor to Colorado Outdoors magazine, shares stories behind some of his favorite photographs, offers simple tips for shooting better images and explains the inspiration that drives his life’s work. Big-game hunters will appreciate Schendel’s exceptional images of elk, bighorn sheep, deer and moose.

 


Video and blog post by Jerry Neal. Neal is the senior video producer and information specialist for Colorado Parks and Wildlife.

Video: Colorado Big-Game Hunting Forecast

As summer fades and temperatures cool, Colorado’s big-game seasons are about to heat up. And, if you plan to hunt this fall you have plenty of reasons to look forward to opening day. Wildlife biologists, in general, predict good hunting across most of the state.

This video provides statewide and regional forecasts for the 2017 big-game seasons:
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Blog post and video by Jerry Neal. Neal is a videographer and information specialist for Colorado Parks and Wildlife. 

Thanks to Conservation Programs, Colorado’s Fish and Wildlife Are Thriving

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A lynx surveys its new home in the San Juan Mountains. Photo by CPW.

Colorado boasts one of the most diverse and abundant wildlife populations in North America. Home to an astonishing 960 wildlife species, it might be easy to assume that Colorado’s fish and wildlife have always flourished. However, many of the state’s most cherished and iconic species prosper today only because of Colorado Parks and Wildlife’s (CPW) species conservation and wildlife reintroduction programs.

From the majestic Rocky Mountain elk and bighorn sheep, to the esteemed cutthroat trout and the renowned Canada lynx, here’s a summary of some of the species that are benefiting from ongoing conservation efforts, as well as the fish and wildlife that are thriving today because of CPW’s long and distinguished history of past achievements.

Colorado Outdoors Online thanks CPW employees, both past and present, who have dedicated their careers to protecting and perpetuating Colorado’s fish and wildlife resources, and graciously acknowledges Great Outdoors Colorado (GOCO), sportsmen and the many conservation organizations who have generously supported these efforts. Read more

What Every Coloradan Should Know About Wildlife

 

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CPW wildlife managers prepare to relocate a moose from a yard in Arvada. Photo by CPW.

Colorado boasts one of the most diverse and abundant wildlife populations in the world. The enormous variety of wildlife is one of the primary reasons Colorado is such a great place to live and recreate. However, with the state’s burgeoning population, managing wildlife and mitigating human-wildlife conflicts is an ever-growing challenge for Colorado Parks and Wildlife’s (CPW) state wildlife managers.

CPW’s wildlife managers have a diverse, demanding and difficult job. When they’re not enforcing fish and game laws, patrolling remote state lands or conducting fish and wildlife research, wildlife managers are active in their local neighborhoods and communities, educating residents on how to safely coexist with wild animals. And, if something goes wrong, they must act quickly and decisively to ensure public safety in dangerous situations.

In this Colorado Outdoors Online blog post, CPW’s wildlife managers offer a unique insight into managing wildlife and share tips and information that all Coloradans should know.
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Use This Fly To Catch Fish Anywhere in Colorado

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Chironomids work well for large trout. Photo by Jerry Neal/CPW.

The cliché holds there are only two things in life that you can count on: death and taxes. Yet, if you’re an angler in Colorado, there are actually three. The third is that you can catch a lot of fish on chironomids.

What is a chironomid you ask? While it sounds like an evil character from a science-fiction movie, chironomids (pronounced “KYRO-nomids”) are actually members of the Chironomidae midge family. Midges are tiny flies that resemble gnats or mosquitos. They are the most prevalent aquatic insects in Colorado, making up more than 50 percent of a fish’s diet in some waters. While tricky to pronounce, fishing with chironomids is quite easy. Read more

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