Category Archives: Conservation

Field Notes of A Rookie Sportsman: Walleye Fishing

Natalie shore fishing at  Lake Pueblo State Park.
Shore fishing with Natalie at Lake Pueblo State Park. Photo by © Travis Duncan/CPW.

Back in May, my daughter, Natalie, and I experienced our first hunt together and came away with great father-daughter memories, even if we didn’t bag a turkey as we hoped.

In July, Natalie and I went on our first real fishing trip together. Oh, we tried fishing before, but I was clueless about catching fish. This trip we knew what we were doing because we’d been taught by Colorado Parks and Wildlife experts on how to bait, cast and land fish. And CPW officers even accompanied us and coached us as we fished.

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2019 Colorado Big Game Leftover License Tips

big-game hunter

What and When is Leftover Day?

Leftover day is the day when Colorado Parks and Wildlife makes all remaining big-game hunting licenses available for purchase. This year, leftover licenses go on sale Tuesday, Aug. 6 at 9 a.m (MDT).

At 9 a.m., licenses will be available for purchase online (CPWshop.com), in person at CPW offices and license retailers (sporting goods stores, hunting and fishing supply stores, etc.), and by phone at 1-800-244-5613. While there are no guarantees that you will get a license on leftover day, there is a great deal of opportunity for big-game hunters looking to get a license to hunt in Colorado this year.

A QUALIFYING LICENSE is NOT required to purchase a leftover limited license, reissued license or an over-the-counter license.

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Restoring the State-endangered Boreal Toad

Paul Foutz and Tim Korpita address staff and volunteers from the back of a pickup before everyone headed up the Brown's Creek trail.
Paul Foutz, Colorado Parks and Wildlife native aquatic species biologist and Boreal toad specialist, and Tim Korpita, University of Colorado doctoral candidate, far right, address staff and volunteers from the back of a pickup before everyone headed up the Brown’s Creek trail with their bags of Boreal toad tadpoles for the Purple Rain treatment and release in the wetland. All photos by © Bill Vogrin/CPW.

As temperatures climbed under a blistering sun, about 35 Colorado Parks and Wildlife aquatic biologists, staff and volunteers headed up a steep mountain trail last week, each loaded with large bags of water filled with 200 or so squirming, black Boreal toad tadpoles.

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Keeping Wildlife Wild: Mountain Goats

Mountain Goat
Young mountain goat stands near the summit of Mount Evans. All photos by © Doug Skinner/CPW.

Every year thousands of residents and tourists drive up the highest paved road in North America located at Mount Evans to be on top of one of Colorado’s 54 14ers, those that soar over 14,000 feet in elevation.

Colorado Parks and Wildlife reminds those that ascend up the Mount Evans Scenic Byway (Colorado Highway 5) to its peak elevation of 14,264 feet to do their part in helping keep wildlife wild by not feeding any animals they encounter and keeping a safe distance from them.

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Rare Hayden Creek Cutthroat Trout

 Justin Krall sits on his mule Speedy
Justin Krall, a District Wildlife Manager for Colorado Parks and Wildlife based in Westcliffe, sits on his mule Speedy as Jenny follows carrying saddle tanks with about 2,000 rare Hayden Creek cutthroat trout.

With his sidearm sticking out from under leather chaps, Justin Krall swung up into the saddle of his mule, Speedy, and gently nudged it up the Cottonwood Creek trail as he tugged the reins of his other mule, Jenny, following behind.

On Jenny’s back were two large saddle tanks packed with about 2,000 rare Hayden Creek cutthroat trout and pressurized steel canisters pumping oxygen into the water. Krall, a District Wildlife Manager for Colorado Parks and Wildlife (CPW), was helping the agency’s aquatic biologists move the fish about six miles up the steep trail to the upper reaches of the creek.

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White-nose Syndrome threatening Colorado Bat Colonies

CPW terrestrial biologist April Estep, (tan uniform) and Cassidy English, CPW district wildlife manager, stretched mist nets over a drainage south of Colorado Springs on a May evening in preparation for catching and studying bats. Photo by © Bill Vogrin/CPW

In a muddy creek drainage on a chilly Sunday evening in May, Colorado Parks and Wildlife terrestrial biologist April Estep looked for a rock large enough to brace a piece of steel rebar she had hammered into the soggy ground.

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Camping and Hiking in Bear Country

Black bear rummaging through campsite.
Photo by Laura Kali is licensed under CC BY 2.0

With warmer weather and melting snowpack, outdoor enthusiasts are enjoying camping and hiking trips in Colorado’s many scenic locations. Colorado Parks and Wildlife staff are frequently asked what someone should do if they encounter a bear while out camping or hiking. Whether you are visiting Colorado for a vacation or are a long-time resident, it’s important to be aware of how to discourage human-bear encounters and how to avoid potential issues before heading out to live life outside.

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Livin’ the Wildlife: Colorado Wild Turkeys

Hunters Fund Conservation

The wild turkey is beloved among hunters and wildlife enthusiasts alike. And the wild turkey’s springtime mating displays are one of the most exciting and stunning events in nature. Yet, these iconic birds only exist today because of dedicated conservation programs. This video provides an overview of the wild turkey’s mating behavior and Colorado Parks and Wildlife’s efforts to conserve this amazing species. The video features both Rio Grande turkeys and the native Merriam’s turkeys.

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Field Notes of a Rookie Sportsman: Excitement Builds for our First-ever Turkey Hunt

Natalie examines turkey feathers
Natalie Duncan, 14, examines turkey feathers during a Turkey Hunting 101 class that was part of CPW’s Rookie Sportsman Program which introduces newcomers and novices to Colorado’s outdoor opportunities including hunting, fishing, camping and hiking. Natalie is taking the class with her father, Travis Duncan, who is a CPW public information officer.

Calling a turkey is much different than being called a turkey. In fact, it’s much harder to call a turkey than I ever dreamed because the birds are really smart.

Thanks to what we learned about the wild, upland ground bird in our Rookie Sportsman Program (RSP) classes in April, my daughter, Natalie, and I have a much deeper appreciation for wild turkey and are more excited than ever as we prepare to go seek them out on what will be our first-ever turkey hunt.

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