Tag Archives: cutthroat trout

TRULY NATIVE

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Colorado Parks and Wildlife (CPW) biologists have discovered a unique genetic lineage of the Colorado River cutthroat trout in southwest Colorado that was thought to be extinct. The agency will continue to evaluate the findings and collaborate with agency partners to protect and manage populations of this native trout.

The discovery was officially recognized earlier this year thanks to advanced genetic-testing techniques that can look into the basic components of an organism’s DNA, the building blocks of life. This find demonstrates the value of applying state-of-the-art genetic science to decades of native cutthroat conservation management and understanding.  Read more

Conservation Programs Help Colorado’s Fish and Wildlife Thrive

lynx adult on log

A lynx surveys its new home in the San Juan Mountains. Photo by CPW.

Colorado boasts one of the most diverse and abundant wildlife populations in North America. Home to an astonishing 960 wildlife species, it might be easy to assume that Colorado’s fish and wildlife have always flourished. However, many of the state’s most cherished and iconic species prosper today only because of Colorado Parks and Wildlife’s (CPW) species conservation and wildlife reintroduction programs.

From the majestic Rocky Mountain elk and bighorn sheep, to the esteemed cutthroat trout and the renowned Canada lynx, here’s a summary of some of the species that are benefiting from ongoing conservation efforts, as well as the fish and wildlife that are thriving today because of CPW’s long and distinguished history of past achievements.

Colorado Outdoors Online thanks CPW employees, both past and present, who have dedicated their careers to protecting and perpetuating Colorado’s fish and wildlife resources, and graciously acknowledges Great Outdoors Colorado (GOCO), sportsmen and the many conservation organizations who have generously supported these efforts. Read more

Fish Facts: 11 Things You Didn’t Know About Colorado’s Fisheries

 cutthroat trout
A cutthroat trout. Photo by Kevin Rogers/CPW.

Colorado is truly an angler’s paradise. Home to more than 9,000 miles of rivers, 2,000 natural lakes and hundreds of gin-clear streams, it’s as if Mother Nature had fishing in mind when she created this beautiful state. And with waters generously dispersed from the high mountains all the way to the Eastern Plains, Colorado’s fishing opportunities are as diverse as the Rocky Mountain landscape.

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Thanks to Conservation Programs, Colorado’s Fish and Wildlife Are Thriving

lynx adult on log

A lynx surveys its new home in the San Juan Mountains. Photo by CPW.

Colorado boasts one of the most diverse and abundant wildlife populations in North America. Home to an astonishing 960 wildlife species, it might be easy to assume that Colorado’s fish and wildlife have always flourished. However, many of the state’s most cherished and iconic species prosper today only because of Colorado Parks and Wildlife’s (CPW) species conservation and wildlife reintroduction programs.

From the majestic Rocky Mountain elk and bighorn sheep, to the esteemed cutthroat trout and the renowned Canada lynx, here’s a summary of some of the species that are benefiting from ongoing conservation efforts, as well as the fish and wildlife that are thriving today because of CPW’s long and distinguished history of past achievements.

Colorado Outdoors Online thanks CPW employees, both past and present, who have dedicated their careers to protecting and perpetuating Colorado’s fish and wildlife resources, and graciously acknowledges Great Outdoors Colorado (GOCO), sportsmen and the many conservation organizations who have generously supported these efforts. Read more

Colorado’s Rio Grande Cutthroat Trout

Rio Grande cutthroat
A Rio Grande cutthroat. Video capture by Jerry Neal (CPW).

Nestled in the rugged mountains of southwest Colorado lies a remote, privately-owned ranch that shelters the pristine waters of Haypress Lake. Each June, Colorado Parks and Wildlife’s fishery biologists and hatchery personnel set up a spawn-take operation at Haypress to collect roe and milt from Rio Grande cutthroat trout. Haypress Lake is the primary collection site in Colorado and the offspring of the Haypress fish are then restocked into nearly 80 lakes and streams throughout the Rio Grande Basin.

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Backcountry Natives

Nearly five years ago, two Colorado Parks and Wildlife volunteers stocked a pair of lakes deep within the Indian Peaks Wilderness. The lakes were stocked with the aid of a mule carrying two ice chests. Each chest contained a bag of water holding 500 greenback cutthroat fingerlings. The fingerlings were kept alive by two air tanks pumping oxygen into the water. The volunteers explained that the mule, fitted with the ice chests and air tanks, looked like a “rocket mule” that was being blasted up the mountain.  Each year those same volunteers return to check the progress of the stocked fingerlings.

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Back Where They Belong: Stocking Rio Grande Cutthroat Trout

  • heading out on horseback
  • Bag full of cutthroats
  • horse mane
  • Unloading horse
  • Stocking Rio Grande Cutthroats

Each September, wildlife manager Rod Ruybalid packs hundreds of native Rio Grande cutthroat trout fingerlings into high-mountain lakes and streams. Although cutthroat trout spawn naturally in the wild, their populations are augmented with native cutthroat trout that are spawned by hand and raised in hatcheries.

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