Tag Archives: Moose

Video: Colorado Moose Management

VIDEO: Colorado Parks and Wildlife research biologists provide a glimpse into the life of a Shiras moose research project. Learn about the questions researchers ask, the methods they use to address those questions, and how the answers can benefit the people and wildlife of Colorado.

Weighing up to 1,000 pounds and towering 6 feet high at the shoulder, moose are Colorado’s largest wild mammal. While moose sightings are fairly common today, moose were quite rare in Colorado throughout most of the 20th century. But, thanks to successful reintroduction and management by Colorado Parks and Wildlife, Colorado’s moose are now one of the fastest-growing herds in the lower 48 states.

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CPW seeks comment on CWD Management Plan

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 Mule deer buck. Photo by © Wayne Lewis/CPW.

Colorado Parks and Wildlife along with the Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) Advisory Group seek public comment on CWD management plan.

CWD-Plan-ShadowFrom October 1 – 31, 2018, Colorado Parks and Wildlife (CPW) is asking for interested individuals to review and comment on the chronic wasting disease (CWD) adaptive management plan created by the CWD Advisory Group. Your comments will be carefully considered before management actions are voted on by the CPW Commission in January.

Please provide feedback using this public comment form.

There are many problems facing our state’s deer and elk herds and CPW is working to overcome these challenges to stabilize, sustain and increase populations and habitats throughout the state. Read more

Conservation Programs Help Colorado’s Fish and Wildlife Thrive

lynx adult on log

A lynx surveys its new home in the San Juan Mountains. Photo by CPW.

Colorado boasts one of the most diverse and abundant wildlife populations in North America. Home to an astonishing 960 wildlife species, it might be easy to assume that Colorado’s fish and wildlife have always flourished. However, many of the state’s most cherished and iconic species prosper today only because of Colorado Parks and Wildlife’s (CPW) species conservation and wildlife reintroduction programs.

From the majestic Rocky Mountain elk and bighorn sheep, to the esteemed cutthroat trout and the renowned Canada lynx, here’s a summary of some of the species that are benefiting from ongoing conservation efforts, as well as the fish and wildlife that are thriving today because of CPW’s long and distinguished history of past achievements.

Colorado Outdoors Online thanks CPW employees, both past and present, who have dedicated their careers to protecting and perpetuating Colorado’s fish and wildlife resources, and graciously acknowledges Great Outdoors Colorado (GOCO), sportsmen and the many conservation organizations who have generously supported these efforts. Read more

What Every Coloradan Should Know About Wildlife

many officers moose eyes covered

CPW wildlife managers prepare to relocate a moose from a yard in Arvada. Photo by CPW.

Colorado boasts one of the most diverse and abundant wildlife populations in the world. The enormous variety of wildlife is one of the primary reasons Colorado is such a great place to live and recreate. However, with the state’s burgeoning population, managing wildlife and mitigating human-wildlife conflicts is an ever-growing challenge for Colorado Parks and Wildlife’s (CPW) state wildlife managers.

CPW’s wildlife managers have a diverse, demanding and difficult job. When they’re not enforcing fish and game laws, patrolling remote state lands or conducting fish and wildlife research, wildlife managers are active in their local neighborhoods and communities, educating residents on how to safely coexist with wild animals. And, if something goes wrong, they must act quickly and decisively to ensure public safety in dangerous situations.

In this Colorado Outdoors Online blog post, CPW’s wildlife managers offer a unique insight into managing wildlife and share tips and information that all Coloradans should know.
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Moose on the Loose: Why Are Colorado’s Shiras Moose Showing Up in Front Range Suburbs?

A cow moose rests on a lawn in Lakewood
A cow moose rests on a lawn in Lakewood. Photo by CPW.

In this segment of “Ask the Biologist,” Colorado Outdoors Online reader Carol Metz asks:

Question

“Why are moose showing up in residential areas along the Front Range?”

Last week, Arvada and Lakewood residents got quite the surprise when two Shiras moose sauntered into town. Colorado Parks and Wildlife officers were able to tranquilize the rogue animals and safely relocate them to more remote habitat in South Park. However, local residents are curious as to why moose appear to be vamoosing the marshy wetlands of Colorado’s mountain parks and are now exploring suburbia.

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CPW Field Journal ‘Sheep and Moose Hunts (Part 1)’

Photo by © Wayne D Lewis(CPW)

Photo by © Wayne D Lewis(CPW)

CPW Field Journal

When it comes to outdoors expertise, no one understands Colorado’s fishery and wildlife resources better than Colorado Parks and Wildlife’s diverse staff of wildlife managers, park rangers and biologists.  For these dedicated individuals, working for CPW is not just an occupation but a way of life.  When they’re not enforcing fish and game laws, patrolling state lands or conducting fish and wildlife research, most CPW employees are avid sportsmen and women who spend their leisure time hunting and angling throughout the state.  Here, CPW staff share their personal stories and experiences, provide on-the-ground field updates and offer a unique, “inside” perspective on all things hunting and fishing in Colorado.

In this special, multi-part series of CPW Field Journal, CPW employee Michael Scott shares his personal experiences applying/drawing for sheep and moose licenses, and provides real-time updates during his preseason scouting and fall hunting trips.
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